• Upcycled Vintage Sheet Curtains

    by  • January 11, 2013 • Crafts & DIY Decor, House Projects & Updates

    I’m excited to show you my DIY upcycled vintage sheet curtains that I made for the kitchen for just $3.25 a panel!

    Upcycled Vintage Sheet Curtains

    Like I mentioned in the kitchen design plan, I bought this queen-sized flat sheet from a thrift store for just $2. I loved the vintage floral pattern and thought it could make an awesome pair of curtains.

    Upcycled Vintage Sheet Curtains

    House of Hepworth’s has a great detailed lined curtain panel tutorial, which I followed pretty closely to make these. Here’s the basic rundown –
    After washing, drying, and ironing the sheet (of course!), I cut it in half and iron a 1/2″ hem on the sides and a 2″ hem at the top of each panel. The sheet was long enough that I could leave the large existing hem (the one that’s normally at the top of the sheet) at the bottom of the panel.

    Upcycled Vintage Sheet Curtains

    I also picked up another $2 queen-sized flat sheet from the thrift store to use for a lining. It was a bit smaller than the floral sheet, so I had to rip the one seam to gain the extra length.

    Upcycled Vintage Sheet Curtains

    Align the tops and one side and tuck the lining under the ironed hem, pinning every few inches.

    Upcycled Vintage Sheet Curtains

    Smooth out all the wrinkles & trim off the excess lining on the remaining side. Then tuck it under the ironed hem and pin.

    Upcycled Vintage Sheet Curtains

    At this point, I morphed House of Hepworths’ tutorial with a back-tab curtain tutorial from View Along the Way. Back-tab curtains are my favorite kinds of panels because they hang the whole way up to the rod (unlike tab-top or clip rings), but I think they hang nicer than a simple rod pocket style. Following her instructions, I cut some 2.5″ strips of fabric ribbon off of a scrap piece that I already had & pinned them every 6ish inches.

    Upcycled Vintage Sheet Curtains

    With 3 sides all tucked & pinned, it’s time to sew.

    Upcycled Vintage Sheet Curtains

    While sewing the top seam, you can run across the tops of the ribbon tabs too to save you a step.

    Upcycled Vintage Sheet Curtains

    Then you just have to go across the the bottoms of the tabs.

    Upcycled Vintage Sheet Curtains

    This is how it will look from the front –

    Upcycled Vintage Sheet Curtains

    You could also just sew a straight line the whole way across for the bottoms of the tabs instead of separate lines for each individual tab. It might make it look more intentional to have another seam rather than the separate little dashes across the top. I didn’t think of that until after I sewed these, or else I probably would have done that. Honestly though, you can’t even see them once they’re hanging so I don’t think it matters.
    Once the sides are sewn too, you can slip the rod through the back tabs and admire your hard work so far!

    Upcycled Vintage Sheet Curtains
    Upcycled Vintage Sheet Curtains

    Looking good! But we’re not done yet. All that’s left to do is pin the bottom of the curtains to the desired length, iron the folds and sew the bottom seam. I like my curtains to just barely hit the floor, but not drag. Mine ended up working out perfectly that all I had to do was fold up the existing hem that was already on the floral sheet, so it has a nice 4″ band across the bottom.

    Upcycled Vintage Sheet Curtains

    And we’re all done! What do you think?

    Upcycled Vintage Sheet Curtains
    Upcycled Vintage Sheet Curtains

    I think the lining makes them look much more professional. Blackout lining would be nice, or I even thought of using a canvas drop cloth to give it a heavier weight, but I went the cheapo route and decided on using another $2 sheet. Even so, I think it gave it just enough structure to help them hang a little nicer and make them less translucent so the colors are more vibrant.

    Upcycled Vintage Sheet Curtains

    I love how they turned out! They brought some more color & pattern to a very white room.
    It’s all a little too warm-toned for me right now with the red door, the jute rug, the wood table and chairs, and now the yellow/orange/brown curtains. But I think that once the chairs are painted a light aqua and I bring in some more cooler tones in the art & accessories, it will all pull together really nicely.

    Upcycled Vintage Sheet Curtains

    Cost:
    Vintage floral flat sheet (thrift store): $2
    Solid flat sheet (thrift store): $2
    Yellow spool of thread: $2.50
    Ribbon back-tabs: $0 (scrap piece of ribbon I already had)
    Total: $6.50 for the pair!
    I think it’s pretty funny that the most expensive piece of this project was the thread. And I still have almost the entire spool leftover to use on other projects. Even so, $3.25 is pretty awesome for a custom, lined, 84″ curtain panel, don’t you think?

    Upcycled Vintage Sheet Curtains

    I have to show off my DIY curtain rod too. It only cost me $1.44! This is another idea that I got from House of Hepworths here.
    I needed curtain rods for this window, two in the studio, and two in the living room. So to make five curtain rods, I bought three 10′ pieces of electrical conduit for $2.14 a piece. Two of them I cut in half to make four 5′ rods (making them $1.07 each), and the last one I trimmed to make an 8′ rod.

    Curtain Rod Made from Electrical Conduit

    The previous homeowners left one curtain rod and a bunch of brackets hanging in the house. The rod is for a valance, so it’s too small to use for hanging curtain panels, but I can steal its brackets & finials! The finials wouldn’t fit on the rod though, so I bought a 1/2″ dowel rod that could fit inside the electrical conduit. I cut it into 6″ pieces, and screwed the finials into 2 dowel pieces.

    Curtain Rod Made from Electrical Conduit
    Curtain Rod Made from Electrical Conduit

    Then the rods, brackets, and dowels/finials all got primed and spray painted a satin black (both of which I already owned).

    Curtain Rod Made from Electrical Conduit

    The dowels just slip right inside the rod, so it’s easy to remove them when you’re putting the curtain panels on or off the rod.

    Curtain Rod Made from Electrical Conduit

    I think it looks exactly like “normal” curtain rods – but at a fraction of the price! I will definitely be doing this for all of my curtain rods from now on. Of course, having the brackets & finials from the other rod made it so simple. For the other rods, I will have to buy some finials, or make some myself. Any ideas for what I could use for finials for the other rods?
    All together, I spent $7.94 on this curtain rod and the two panels. This is how you renovate a kitchen on a tight budget! I like the challenge, and I’m loving how it’s coming together so far!

    Upcycled Vintage Sheet Curtains

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